The self-annihilating juncture of over-imitation

In ‘Weirdness’, Modernity and the Other Europe in Attenberg by Jun Okada, mimicry is interpreted as a mechanism through which people acquire their knowledge base and constitute their identities. While Okada is right to say that imitation has clear importance for identity, we nonetheless have to transcend this default responsiveness to foreign figures in order … Continue reading The self-annihilating juncture of over-imitation

Interruption: A false sense of participation created by deconstructing the theatre of alienation

By offering a series of general shots from the perspectives of audiences, Interruption (Yorgos Zois) invites a sense of involvement for viewers in the actual theatre and weakens the passive spectatorship by connecting the screening room to the fictional auditorium in the film with “a streamlined continuum of dark seats” (Amber Wilkinson, 2). Together with the … Continue reading Interruption: A false sense of participation created by deconstructing the theatre of alienation

Mimicry in Attenberg and Fit: A pathway of externalization

    Mimicry, a common phenomenon observed between parents and children, as well as between conqueror and the conquered, is often interpreted as a mechanism through which developing countries acquire national identities in the postcolonial era. By mirroring the cultural and socioeconomic activities observed in industrialized countries, citizens of developing countries internalize the standards and … Continue reading Mimicry in Attenberg and Fit: A pathway of externalization